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The 17 lives extinguished in the Florida school…

The gunman who opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, wiped out lives, and left families and friends struggling to cope after America's latest mass shooting.

You Could Buy Michelangelo's Villa (if You Have…

If you’ve got $9 million burning a hole in your pocket, you could buy a Tuscan farmhouse once owned by Michelangelo. Buzz60's Josh King has more.

Kate Middleton Might've Worn A Green Dress To The…

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a dark-green gown to the BAFTAs, and social media users on Twitter expressed their disappointment.

Louisville To Vacate Men's Basketball National…

The NCAA denied an appeal from the University of Louisville after it found a former men's basketball staffer committed serious ethics violations.

GOP candidate defends campaign's AR-15 giveaway

Kansas congressional candidate Tyler Tannahill defends continuing his campaign's AR-15 giveaway in the wake of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting, saying, "I do support the Second Amendment in the hard times and the bad."

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Rhode Island marks 15 years since 100 killed in…

Rhode Island is marking the 15th anniversary of a nightclub fire that killed 100 people and injured more than 200 others

Trump plan: Less health insurance for lower…

Latest Trump administration health care idea: less insurance for lower premiums

Storm system brings flooding, freezing rain, snow…

A storm system stretching from Texas to the Great Lakes states with risks of flooding, freezing rain and snow is being blamed for fatal crashes in three states, including an accident that left four dead in Nebraska

3M to pay $850 million to settle suit over…

3M Co. has agreed to pay the state of Minnesota $850 million to settle a major case alleging the manufacturer damaged natural resources and contaminated groundwater by disposing of chemicals over decades, attorneys announced Tuesday

Insiders: Russia troll farm even zanier than…

Insiders say the U.S. indictment against the St. Petersburg troll farm only scratches the surface of the agency's zany, ambitious operations _ and glosses over just how unconvincing some of its stunts could be

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Makes Headway in DC

Elon Musk's dream of building a hyperloop that can move people between Washington, DC, and New York City in 29 minutes may be a small step closer to becoming a distant reality. A Nov. 29 permit issued by DC's Department of Transportation allows Musk's Boring Company to dig at an...

How major US stock indexes fared Tuesday

A late-afternoon sell-off pulled U.S. stocks lower Tuesday, snapping a six-day winning streak

Prosecutor: Woman sought hit man over relative's $40k policy

A federal prosecutor says a 32-year-old Mississippi woman has pleaded guilty to trying to hire a hit man to kill her half-brother so she'd get $40,000 in life insurance

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FBI had probed convicted ex-Arkansas judge 20…

A former Arkansas judge who admitted giving lighter sentences to men in return for sexual favors was investigated for similar crimes two decades ago but was never charged because he gave up his job as a deputy prosecutor

Millennials Have The Most Patience For Bad…

In the battle between who can keep their cool the longest, Millennials came out on top.

What Do The BAFTA Winners Say About The Upcoming…

"Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" won five of the top honors at the British Academy of Film and Television Arts movie awards.

Supreme Court Won't Hear Challenge To Calif. Gun…

The U.S. Supreme Court said it won't hear a case that claims California's full 10-day waiting period shouldn't apply to people who already own a gun.

Idaho lawmaker not sorry for yelling 'abortion is…

A Republican Idaho state senator says he won't apologize for yelling "abortion is murder" at a group of university students who were pushing for birth control legislation at the Statehouse

The Latest: California winter now third driest on record

State water officials postpone vote on new water wasting restrictions as winter reaches third-driest on record

Medical implants could be a future target for…

As the technology that powers medical implants grows more and more complex, researchers warn that they could become a prime target for cybersecurity intrusions. A new paper published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology focuses on the potential risk of medical implants like pacemakers to be hacked by individuals seeking to cause trouble. The study brings some good news, but also urges caution in the design of future medical devices. At the moment, the vast majority of medical implants are "dumb," meaning that they have limited remote connectivity and cannot be accessed or altered by a would-be hacker. However, some newer implants feature remote monitoring features that allow doctors to keep an eye on a patient's wellbeing without requiring them to visit a clinic, and it's features like those which could offer a gateway for bad actors wishing to do harm. "True cybersecurity begins at the point of designing protected software from the outset, and requires the integration of multiple stakeholders, including software experts, security experts and medical advisors," Dhanunjaya R. Lakkireddy MD, of the University of Kansas Hospital, and co-author of the paper, explains. The doctor's urgency for forward-looking security features is shared by many in the medical community, as well as the patients themselves. The risks of a potentially hackable medical implant are huge. Medical devices that can have their settings tweaked remotely are obviously the most serious targets, but even implants which simply relay information could be at risk of exploits that would drain their batteries, leaving patients vulnerable. However, while the theoretical dangers are many, doctors have yet to see any widespread issues pop up in real-world scenarios. "The likelihood of an individual hacker successfully affecting a cardiovascular implantable electronic device or being able to target a specific patient is very low," Lakkireddy notes. "A more likely scenario is that of a malware or ransomware attack affecting a hospital network and inhibiting communication." Looking to the future, the paper urges researchers and medical professionals to demonstrate extreme caution in the design and implementation of medical systems that could be remotely accessed. The danger may not be serious yet, but as more and more medical implants embrace wireless diagnostic and tracking features they will almost certainly become a larger target.

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Late-Night Uber Eats Delivery Ends With Dead…

An Uber Eats driver claims he was acting in self-defense when he killed a customer during his first week on the job. Robert Bivines, 36, arrived at the Atlanta condominium of 30-year-old Ryan Thornton around 11:30pm Saturday after a $27 food order was placed at Tin Lizzy's through the...

After School Shootings, Russian Bots Hijacked Gun…

For Russia-linked Twitter accounts and bots linked to Russian propaganda campaigns, last week's horrific school shooting in Florida was just another opportunity to sow division among Americans, security researchers say. Within an hour of the shooting, hundreds of automated Twitter accounts with suspected Russian links began sending out tweets with...

Walmart's plunge sinks retailers, breaking streak…

Walmart's biggest drop in 30 years and losses in other sectors pulled U.S. indexes lower Tuesday, snapping a six-day winning streak